The Round Table and the Fall of the Second British Empire

  This article was first published in The Present Age magazine Vol. 3 No. 11 Feb. 2018 In the January 2018 issue of TPA, (‘The Anglo-Saxons’ and the European Union Project) I wrote, amongst other things, about a book published by Cambridge Scholars Press  in the run-up to the 2016 EU Referendum in Britain titled June 1940, Great Britain and the First Attempt to Build a European Union....
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The Cecils and the End of the British Empire

This article was first published in the monthly magazine The Present Age Vol. 3 No. 7 in October 2017 This is the fourth in a short series of articles about the historical consequences of the rivalry between Philip IV (the Fair) of France (r.1285-1314), who destroyed the Order of the Knights Templar, and his rival Edward I of England (r. 1272-1307) who sought to conquer Wales and Scotland....
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The Cecils – Uncle and Nephew

This article was first published in the monthly magazine The Present Age September 2017, Vol. 3 No. 6 This is the third in a series of 5 articles which is rooted in the tortuous destiny between England and France, the two western countries which ‘pioneered’ modern nationalism, that view of life that has had such fateful consequences over the past 250 years. The modern western concept of the...
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The Cecils – Father and Son

This article was first published in the monthly magazine The Present Age August 2017, Vol. 3 No. 5 The previous article to this one, in the July issue of “The Present Age” magazine, outlined how and why a certain mysterious and often tragic connection can be said to exist between the deeds of King Philip IV (‘the Fair’) of France (1285-1314) and those of King Henry VIII of...
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King Philip IV (‘the Fair’) of France and Henry VIII of England

This article was first published in The Present Age magazine Vol. 3 No. 5 July 2017 In a lecture of 1 October 1916 Rudolf Steiner discusses the superficiality of much of the modern study of history and points out that “when one traces things back to their causes in the superficial easy-going way that modern history largely employs, one comes to positive absurdities. Ultimately, one would have...
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